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RUBRIC HELPS GUARANTEE FAIR GRADING OF DISCUSSION BOARDS

Mar 24, 2020, 17:18 PM
<2-min. read> Getting students engaged in online discussions is a way to assess their level of comprehension of the content. But how to you ensure you're grading their responses fairly? A grading rubric will keep you consistent.

DOWNLOAD A PDF OF THE DISCUSSION BOARD GRADING RUBRICDISCUSSION GRADING RUBRIC (SAMPLE)


Many of ATI's expert nurse educators previously developed, coached, and taught online curricula. They know the delicate balance required in deciding how to grade students' responses in the online discussion boards that are a crucial part of these virtual courses.

But how do ensure you're fairly comparing the verbose student (who posts daily but offers little to advance the discussion) to the more reticent student who posts less often (but offers thoughtful commentary)?

To help, they have created a sample grading rubric. Use it as a starting point for creating your own guide for evaluating the quality of student discussions.

If you need ideas on how to organize and encourage online conversations, read "16 Tips to make your discussion boards the most effective." 

Note: This rubric is an example of high-level suggestions for online learning when responding to face-to-face classroom cancellations. Suggestions here are not meant to replace best practices in online learning.

 

DISCUSSION GRADING RUBRIC (SAMPLE)


EXEMPLARY
(5 POINTS)
PROFICIENT
(4 POINTS)
SUFFICIENT
(3 POINTS) 
DEVELOPING
(2 OR LESS POINTS) 
  • Discussion posts and responses are responsive to the requirements of the discussion instructions and are posted by the due date.
  • Discussion posts and responses significantly contribute to the quality of interaction by providing relevant examples, supporting documentation, and stimulating thought, demonstrating respect in tone and language.
  • Discussion posts and responses provide evidence that the student has read and considered a sampling of classmates’ posts and synthesized key comments and ideas as applicable.
  • Discussion posts and responses are responsive to the requirements of the discussion instructions and are posted by the due date.
  • Discussion posts and responses contribute to the quality of interaction
    by providing examples, supporting documentation, and ideas in a respectful manner.
  • Discussion posts and responses demonstrate some depth of understanding of the
    issues and show that the student has absorbed the general principles and ideas presented in the course.
  • Discussion posts and responses provide evidence that the student has considered at least some classmates’ posts and synthesized some key comments and ideas, as applicable.
  • Discussion posts and responses are posted by the due date but are not always responsive to the requirements of the discussion instructions.
  • Discussion posts and responses do little to contribute to the quality of interaction or to stimulate thinking and learning.
  • Discussion posts and responses demonstrate a minimal understanding of concepts presented, tend to address peripheral issues, and display some omissions and/or errors.
  • Discussion posts and responses do not provide evidence that the student has considered at least some classmates’ posts or synthesized at least some key
    comments and ideas as applicable.
  • Discussion posts and responses are posted past the late deadline, defined as 11:59 p.m. on the due date, and/or do not address the requirements of the discussion instructions.
  • Discussion posts and responses do not contribute to the quality of interaction or stimulate thinking and learning.
  • Discussion posts and responses do not demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in the course, and/or do not address relevant issues, and/or are inaccurate.
  • Discussion posts and responses do not provide evidence that the student has read or considered classmates’ posts as applicable.

Do you have a rubric you'd like to share with your educator peers? Please add a link to it in the comments.